What the Floods!

  • Posted on: 5 November 2007
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

July Stand-by, August a Must, September Remember and October…OVER? Not in Haiti and certainly not now. In recent years the 10th and 11th months in Haiti are this educational weather ditty’s August, October and November a Must. As the rains have rearranged this hurricane jingle they have also rearranged Haiti’s rivers to destroy homes and lives, numerous Haitians are now living in temporary shelters.

Beyond Replication - Rwanda scales up PIH model as National Rural Health System

  • Posted on: 1 November 2007
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Members of the Haiti Innovation Community are by now no doubt familiar with the organization Partners in Health and the pionerring work their team has done in Haiti bringing community based health care to  the lowest possible resource settings, and in particular, developing novel new approaches to treating both HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis.

 

Stormy Times Ahead: It's Time for a Plan

  • Posted on: 29 October 2007
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Per the article below, a U.S. Congressional Delegation visiting Haiti to assess the extent of flood damage from tropical storms had to finish the trip early and return stateside as a result of another approaching tropical storm.  In a country that is both deforested and has limited infrastructure, storms can have very serious consequences.

The Plumpynut Paradigm Shift: Treating Severe Malnutrition v 2.0

  • Posted on: 26 October 2007
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

It would be an under-statement to say that Haiti is a hungry country. Population growth, deforestation, and a weak economy are just a few reasons.  Hunger also contributes to instability in Haiti - building a functional democracy that can endure over the long term is a challenge when many do not know where their next meal is coming from.

 

Time to Edit the Haitian Constitution?

  • Posted on: 24 October 2007
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Is a Constitution a living document?  If it cannot be changed, does this make it more relevant or does it become less relevant as a people, country, and its government changes?  There is a tradition in Latin America of scrapping and re-drafting Constitutions entirely.  Some countries have had more than fifteen in their existance. 

 

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