Jacqueline Charles

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Worsening Gang Violence and Kidnappings in Port au Prince

  • Posted on: 13 July 2022
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Gang violence in Haiti's largest city continues to have a pervasive negative impact that reverberates throughout the country, affecting security, the economy, food security, education, and health care.  According to Jacqueline Charles of the Miami Herald, dozens of people have been killed and more than a hundred injured in a new round of deadly violence  "aggravating fuel shortages, raising transportation costs and making an already troubling humanitarian crisis even worse."  Further, 20,000 residents of the densely populated slums have been displaced by gang violence since May.  A July 8 article about gang violence in Port au Prince is copied below and linked is an update by Charles.

Update: Donations Help Maternity Hospital Reopen with New Generator

  • Posted on: 21 January 2022
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Good News! Upon having their generator stolen by a gang, the situation was grim for the Saint Croix Hospital in Leogane and the many people who depended upon it.  With the support of Miami Herald readers, a new generator was purchased and transported to Leogane by boat in order to avoid having it stolen by gangs again.  With their generous support the gang lost, the hospital re-opens, and much needed care can be provided to pregnant women.  A small group of people committed to Haiti made a real difference in this situation.  

Haitian President Assassinated, Government in Disarray

  • Posted on: 7 July 2021
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

The Haitian President has been killed in his home and his wife wounded.  He came into power in 2017 and has been ruling by decree since January 2020.  While he did little to address Haiti's underlying issues, and may in fact have made them worse, neither he nor his wife deserved this.  The former president's seventh prime minister had not been nominated yet, the President of the Supreme Court died of COVID, and the path ahead for replacing the President is unclear.  Amongst all of Haiti's problems, the government is now in disarray.  The full article by Miami Herald Journalists Jacqueline Charles and Johnny Fils-Aime is below with updates to follow. 

UN Calls on Haiti to Settle Differences and Hold Elections

  • Posted on: 26 March 2021
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

The UN Security Council may not agree on much but it is unanimous in urging Haiti to settle political differences and hold elections.  The conditions for having an election are challenging - and flawed elections have made Haiti's situation worse in the past.  Still, the current political impasse is untenable.  As insecurity increases, gangs once again fill the void.  Protests are frequent, the economy is not growing, and basic services do not reach those most in need.  In short, the risk of collapse is real.  An article by Miami Herald journalist Jacqueline Charles folllows. 

In Outrage Over Haitian Student's Killing, Focus Turns to Artists and Influencers

  • Posted on: 11 November 2020
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Haitian women hold together families, communities, and the country.  Despite this, violence against women and girls remains a persistent problem.  The kindnapping, torture, and murder of a high school girl has infuriated civil society who are pushing artists, influences, and politicans to do more to prevent and respond.  The girl, Evelyne Sincère, has become a symbol of injustice - but not indifference this time.  If Haiti is to change, both civil society and the government will need to work tirelessly for the protection of women and girls.  The best way to honor Evelyne is to prevent it from happening to anyone else.  The full article by Miami Herald journallist Jacqueline Charles follows. 

Prayer and Preparation: How One Haiti Hospital is Confronting COVID-19

  • Posted on: 20 May 2020
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Below is an article by Miami Herald journalist Jacqueline Charles about Haiti's response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the University Hospital of Mirebalais which plays a central role in it.  The University Hospital is one of the few hospitals with the capacity to stabilise patients with COVID-19 and to provide these services free of charge.  The Hospital staff are preparing for a potential surge in cases which could be caused by Haitians returning from the Dominican Republic due to lost livelihoods, the near impossibility of social distancing, and a health care system that was fragile even prior to the pandemic.  If you are looking for a way to help Haiti as it responds to the pandemic, consider a donation to Partners in Health which manages the University Hospital and remains the largest non-profit health care provider in the country.  

Haitians Will Lose Deportation Protection in 2019

  • Posted on: 21 November 2017
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

The Trump Administration has announced it will end Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Haitians in 2019 meaning they must return by then or face deportation.  While such status is meant to be temporary, Haitians have integrated, are working, and part of their American communities.  It is clear that the Haitian government does not have the capacity to reintegrate tens of thousands of its citizens - particularly given the impact of Hurricane Matthew and the ongoing cholera outbreak.  This could further destablise Haiti. The full article the Miami Herald's Jacqueline Charles follows. 

Canada Shows Compassion to Haitian Asylum Seekers

  • Posted on: 7 August 2017
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

Haitians are increasingly seeking asylum in Canada for fear of being deported when a six month Temporary Protected Status extension concludes on January 22nd .  According to the Miami Herald copied below, the Montreal City Council estimates that half of the 6,500 asylum seekers arriving since January are Haitian.  In the United States, civil society groups continue to advocate for another extension.

World Bank: Haiti Should Focus on Primary Health Care Not Hospitals

  • Posted on: 29 June 2017
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

A World Bank study recommends that Haiti and its donors focus less on building hospitals and more on preventative and primary care.  Haiti spends less than 5 percent of its budget on health care meaning that it must prioritize. The best run hospitals have long been managed by or co-managed with non-governmental organizations.  Public hospitals are in need of serious reform. Ninety pecent of operating budgets for hospitals are for payroll with an over-emphasis on administration.  Decentralization could potentially empower health facilities by allowing staff to make their own budgetary and human resource decisions.  The full article by Miami Herald journalist Jacqueline Charles follows. 

Haitians Get Six Months of Protection From Deportation

  • Posted on: 23 May 2017
  • By: Bryan Schaaf

The current administration has granted undocumented Haitians in the United States an additional six months of Temporary Protected Status (TPS), protecting them from deportation...at least for now.  The Department of Homeland Security has warned that this may be the final six months of TPS and Haitians should prepare for return.  It is difficult to imagine how Haiti can absorb 60,000 returnees at this point in time - especially those who would be returning to the hurricane affected Grande Anse.  Due in large part to Hurricane Matthew, the economy is expected to contract ths year.  Additional information follows in a Miami Herald article by Jacqueline Charles below.  

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